WTK: Value of M1891/24 Lotta rifle?

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ValmetRKm62
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WTK: Value of M1891/24 Lotta rifle?

Post by ValmetRKm62 » Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:28 am

WTK: Value of Sako mfg'd M1891/24 Mosin-Nagant "Lotta" rifle with Buhler steel barrel? Gun is all original. Any info is appreciated, thanks!

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Cabhammer
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Post by Cabhammer » Wed Jun 03, 2009 4:00 pm

Condition dependent, I would think that a decent example would fetch above $450. There were not many of that rifle made (less than 36,000) and most of them were rebuilt into M39s after the fact at the beginning of WW2.

The S cartouche is not Sako, but the logo for the Civil Guard, Sako did not begin manufacturing until about 1942 of the M39 series.

There are variations of the Lotta rifle. Measure your barrel length. If it is 24" you have hit the jackpot and have a carbine conversion that only 650 were made of and would be worth at least $1,000. The regular 91/24s have a 31.5" barrel, so you will know if you have a carbine or not.

This thread is useless without pics, especially closeups of the barrel shank markings.....
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ValmetRKm62
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Post by ValmetRKm62 » Wed Jun 03, 2009 5:15 pm

Thanks for the info. How do I tell what mfg it is? I don't recall any markings on the receiver ring (aside from #'s and the "S").

I'll have to dig it out of the safe and take some pics. It's definitely the rifle version...you could pole vault with the damn thing.

As I remember condition is spotty, definitely well-used but not a tomato-stake.

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Cabhammer
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Post by Cabhammer » Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:54 pm

Prior to WW2 there is only one rifle factory in Finland and that is the workshop for the Civil Guard that becomes the SAKO plant later.

To determine the original Russian manufacturer, you need to pull the receiver out of the stock an look under the rear receiver tang (Where the rear stock screw is). You will see a funny symbol and two numbers. The two numbers are the last two of the year and the funny symbol tells what plant originally made the gun. Later guns have receiver marking that are usually ground of when worked on by the Finns.
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Miku
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Post by Miku » Sat Jun 13, 2009 9:43 am

Cabhammer has it right.

The "Lottakivääri" - Lotta rifle was created from old russian 1891 rifles that were coming to their end of service lives. The barrels of these rifles were so worn that new barrels were ordered from SIG Switzerland and Venus Germany. The Civil Guard workshop made the barrel swappings, starting from late summer in 1925 and designated those rifles to the Civil guard (Suojeluskunta, "S" ).

The name "Lotta" comes from an organisation who helped to collect tthe funds to buy those barrels. The Lotta Svärd was an organisation of volunteer women who served in all kinds of tasks in the WW2. They were in air surveillance, Red Cross etc. Lotta is also a finnish womans name.

The Lotta Svärd organisation is still highly respected here in Finland even though it no longer exists. There are still numerous members of the Lotta Svärd organisation still alive today.

Miku

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