B and D barrel Marks...which is which?

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Robert @ RTG Parts
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B and D barrel Marks...which is which?

Post by Robert @ RTG Parts » Sat Sep 20, 2008 7:40 am

My Valmet is marked D on the barrel. Which marking allows for both russian and western ammunition?

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Post by tomovich » Sun Sep 21, 2008 10:31 am

It's been a while since I was heavy into collecting my Mosins (they're currently collecting dust :roll: ) but I thought the "B" marking was just on the Belgian Steel barrels the Finns used and the "D" refers to the cartridge.

Anyone else?
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Post by jyri.h » Sun Sep 21, 2008 10:42 am

"D" marked barrel could be ok for both ammo, but not in every case. For example some m28-30's were marked with "D" postwar, but the barrel measurements are closer to .308, so its not wise to use the russian ammunition in those guns. M39 original chamber is suitable for russian ammo. M39 doesnt have that marking.

The D-marking indicates that the chamber has been modified to copeup with finnish militarybullet D166 200grs. Some m28-30 chamber's could be originally too tight/short for that bullet (designed to use with D46-bullet) so after war finnish army arsenal's modified most chambers for D166.

I have 1937 built m28-30 which was uprated to army's standardrifle m28-57 in late 50's. It has dioptersights and modified bolt handle. That gun has "D" marking and it was modified to m28-76 in 70's with a new type of stock and sling. D-marking could be made in 50's or in 70's.

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Post by Cabhammer » Sat Sep 27, 2008 10:58 am

Both answers correct. However I was under the understandind that the D barrel meant that Russian surplus was OK. The original Finn dimensions were for .308 bullets, and that is why the 7.62x53R was the original FInn designation for the caliber. After the war started, the earlier chamber guns were rechambered and marked with D to indicate that surplus ammo was OK. The M39 guns were already chambered for the Russian ammo.

So if you have a barrel on an earlier gun NOT marked with a D you may see high pressures. However, I have shot Czech surplus in my M28 with a .308 barrel and have seen no real issues (The bor cleans up real nices though!)

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Post by Tom Doniphon » Sat Sep 27, 2008 2:43 pm

I was told the same thing Cabby said by my new friend who has lots of Finn Nagants. He said that was what the D on the M39's meant also. Cabby do you know if that is the meaning of the D on the M39 barrels?

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Post by Cabhammer » Sun Sep 28, 2008 1:22 pm

If the D is in place on an M39, then that barrel was one that was stamped while that gun was another model like a M27 or M28 or something and then converted into an M39. M39 guns that were made as new do not have the Ds since the chambers were already set for the .311 bullets.

I have seen M39s that have markings on them from their original 1896 M91 builds. The Sako and Tikka guns are most likely to come this way, as most Valmets were made brand new and not from recovered parts.

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Post by Tom Doniphon » Sun Sep 28, 2008 4:55 pm

Here is the "D" on the barrel
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VKT Mosin 39 003 (Large).jpg

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Post by Cabhammer » Mon Sep 29, 2008 1:59 pm

Hex receiver tells the tale. If you take that receiver out of the stock you will find that it was a reclaimed m91 with an earlier receiver build date. That means that it was converted to a M39 rather than built as one from "new" parts. The 1944 date is the rebuild date....

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Post by Tom Doniphon » Mon Sep 29, 2008 5:34 pm

So were there any "new" Valmet receivers on the original new M39's? Was this a new barrel installed when it was converted to M39 configuration?

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Post by Cabhammer » Tue Sep 30, 2008 1:52 am

No the "D" stamps tells the tale that it was a re-used barrel. New barrels will have the VKT ans SA marks the S/N and the year and that is it. They will also have not been set back at all as far as length.

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Tom Doniphon
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Post by Tom Doniphon » Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:36 pm

More pictures
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VKT Mosin 39 007 (Medium).jpg

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Tom Doniphon
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Post by Tom Doniphon » Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:37 pm

More
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VKT Mosin 39 008 (Medium).jpg

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Post by Tom Doniphon » Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:37 pm

even more
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VKT Mosin 39 009 (Medium).jpg

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Post by Tom Doniphon » Tue Sep 30, 2008 7:39 pm

These pictures were taken deep in the high Finnish arctic desert (in summer).

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